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02

Sep 2019

Bankruptcy Towing and Storage Scam

Posted by / in Blog, Weekly Posts /

New Bankruptcy Towing and Storage Scam

Don sent me today a letter offering him a $1000 for the car he’s giving up as part of his bankruptcy. (He owes way more than the car is worth.)

An outfit calling itself Towing and Storage offers to give him $1000 to avoid “the hassle” of dealing with his car after he filed bankruptcy. Wow!  What a deal!

Don thinks this might be too good to be true.  (Here’s a copy of that letter.)

I don’t know about the specific company that contacted Don. But I do know how a towing and storage scam could, legally, “steal” the car.  Saying yes to a scam offer, could get Don’s entire bankruptcy disapproved. If what Towing and Store is suggesting is legal for them, it may not be NOT legal for Don, or for you.

A towing and storage scam might use what’s called a garageman’s lien.  Any company that works on a car, or just tows and stores it, has the right to be paid.  And if they are not paid on time, they can sell the car.  Sell the car WITHOUT having to pay off the debt to the car finance people.  Using the garageman’s lien, a towing and storage scam can transform your upside down financed car into a valuable paid for car! And keep all the money for themselves.

Towing company offers bankruptcy scam

Don got a letter offering to avoid  “the hassle” of after bankruptcy car repossession. Saying yes, could get his bankruptcy disapproved.

Meanwhile, the car finance people are waiting to get permission from the bankruptcy court to pick up your car–and of course they expect to pick it up from you. By the time everyone has figured out what’s going on, the towing and storage scam has legally sold the car. That would be one way a towing and storage scam can afford to give Don the $1000.

Do you care? 

The bankruptcy code requires you “surrender” property to the bankruptcy trustee. That does NOT mean you want to ship your furniture to the bankruptcy court, or drop off the car in the courthouse parking lot. If there’s still a payment on the car, the bankruptcy trustee does not want it. But you are required to keep the property safe until told otherwise. (Usually, at your hearing, your meeting of creditors, the bankruptcy trustee “abandons” your car, meaning gives it back to you.)

But your discharge can still be denied, meaning you still have to pay everybody, if you “transferred, removed, destroyed…” property you are supposed to keep safe. In other words, letting a towing and storage scam pick up your car could make your whole bankruptcy pointless.  That might not come up at your bankruptcy meeting of creditors hearing. But when the car finance people look for the car, and don’t find it, they can raise a stink. 

Maybe it’s not a scam

Let’s look again at the letter Don got. It says “We will contact your lien holder immediately and arrange for the return of your vehicle.” Maybe they do arrange for the return of the vehicle. Then Don’s ahead by $1000.  And I guess everybody is happy. But if it’s a towing and storage scam, the car finance people have been cheated out of their rights to the car. And they could make Don’s bankruptcy end badly.

 

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03

Aug 2019

“Just Don’t Pay” as an Alternative to Bankruptcy

Posted by / in Weekly Posts /

Bankruptcy Alternative: Just Don’t Pay

Some people want or need an alternative to Chapter 7 bankruptcy. 

Meet Henry Hudson and his wife Beth. They came to see me several years ago. Their alternative to bankruptcy was a two part plan: just don’t pay, and “call my lawyer.” Here’s why.

Henry and Beth were elderly, he was retired, she was working a little. They had credit cards they couldn’t pay, about $40,000.

They could file Chapter 7 bankruptcy and clear those debts. But they didn’t want to. They owned an investment that had lots of sentimental value, and if they filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the court would sell it. The creditors would only get 10 cents on the dollar or less, if it was sold, but the emotional loss to the Hudsons was more than they were willing.

“Call my lawyer!”

Consumer tells debt collectors to call my lawyer.

When the bill collectors call, tell them to “call my lawyer.”

So I told them, just don’t pay. (They were already about five months behind when they came to see me.)  And start taking the calls!  When they call, tell them “call my lawyer!” We’ll see if that get’s them to leave you alone.

Henry and Beth paid me $700 to rent my fierce reputation, plus $100 a month. We met in person every three or four months. Years went by. I told them, if the bill collectors leave you alone too long, they are too late.  That’s called the statute of limitations.

How Long is the Statute of Limitations?

Original creditors, like the credit card companies, have five years to take you to court. If they wait longer than that, they are too late. (That’s in Virginia; other states can be more or less.) For debt buyers, people like LVNV, Midland, Portfolio, it’s probably only three years, arguably two.  (The three years was based on Opinion of the Attorney General 10-028.  The current Virginia Attorney General appears to have deleted it.)

Finally, years later…

Finally, years later, Henry got court papers from one the biggest credit cards, around $8,000.  We had met just two months before and I told them I thought time had run out and everybody was SOL (Statute of Limitations.) Now there’s court papers.

We File Chapter 13

Chapter 13 is a payment plan through the bankruptcy court.  In Chapter 13, you don’t put your property at risk (unless you want to sell it) because you are paying your debts. Henry and Beth file a plan to pay their debts in full.

Pay in full? Yes, but not $40,000 that would have been payment in full when we first talked. Pay in full all the debts that were not SOL.  Turned out only one $700 recent credit card was not too old under the Statute of Limitations.  Including the one that had filed the warrant in debt. 

So that $700 card got paid in full; and the other debts were just gone.

This Doesn’t Always Work

We were helped that Henry and Beth did NOT owe money to Discover. Discover is very quick to sue. Their cars were paid for. And they were renters, not home owners. That means their credit report did NOT show any debts actually getting paid.

It’s My Job to Suggest the Best Plan for You

As a lawyer, I’m a fiduciary. I’m required by law and legal ethics to give you the best advice I have. Even though I’m a bankruptcy lawyer, sometimes a non-bankruptcy solution works best. And when it does, I tell you.

For most people, bankruptcy works.

But when “just don’t pay” will work better, I’ll tell you so.

PS  More on the statute of limitations

The Washington Post just had this interesting article, about how debt collectors can try to get around the statute of limitaitons.

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14

May 2016

Filing Bankruptcy and Keeping Your Car with Your Credit Union

Posted by / in Weekly Posts /

The Small Print Says Your Credit Union Can Repossess Your Car If You Are Late on Your Credit Cards.

When you get a car loan from a credit union, you sign in small print that they can repossess your car if you don’t pay your credit cards.  (I have never seen a bank do this; I don’t know why they don’t.)  That would apply to a credit card you already had with the credit union, or one you get later.  This is usually called cross-collateralization. 

Credit union car loan

Credit Unions get you to sign in small print that they can repossess your car if you don’t pay your credit cards.

Credit Unions really do it, too.  If you get maybe three months behind on your credit card payments with your credit union, they will apply your car loan payments to the credit card, and send the repo man to your house, to pick up the car.

How Does Bankruptcy Change That?

The basic rule of law is that secured debts–debts attached to something like your car–pass through the bankruptcy unaffected.  So the deal may still be the same.  

In my experience, once you file for bankruptcy, the credit unions will usually allow you to just pay the car loan.  (Since the credit card is discharged, applying the car payment to the credit card would violate the bankruptcy discharge.)  But once the car loan is paid for, they won’t send you the title.  That’s because the credit card is still attached to the car and the credit card has not been paid off. So, you never really have a paid for car.

If they want to be mean about it, the credit unions can just pick up the car.  Because under the 2005 bankruptcy law, they are allowed to pick up your car when you file bankruptcy, even if you are current.  (I explain that, here.) I’ve seen Alaska Credit Union and Suncoast Credit Union do that.  (There are probably others that do. There are 7000 different credit unions; I barely know seven.)

The Credit Unions around here will give you a chance to reaffirm the loan.  That means you make a new, after-bankruptcy promise to pay, and they agree to accept it.  When that new promise is paid off, they should send you the title.  (They “should” send you the title. The reaffirmation form, set by law, says nothing about that. I got into a fight with Apple Federal Credit Union on that, once.  Apple, an outfit we like, then agreed to send the title.)

Ordinarily, I do not like to reaffirm car loans, as I explain here.  But you do get something when you reaffirm with the credit union. You get the title when the reaffirmed loan is paid off. So if you want to, I’ll sign your reaffirmation. (I charge $100 for doing the very annoying form.)

Do They Ever Negotiate?

Recently, I had a client who had two car loans with PenFed Credit Union. On one, he was about break even; on the other, he owed $11,000 and the car was only worth $8,000. He told me to tell PenFed, “I won’t reaffirm for more than the car is worth.” So, I crossed out his agreement to pay back $11,000, wrote in $8000, and sent it back to them.  They told me, “We’re not negotiating on the loan; we’re coming to get the car.” “Don’t do that,” my client said, “I’ll sign.”

As your lawyer, I have to sign on your reaffirmation, that I helped you “negotiate” the reaffirmation. I’ve never actually negotiated any change from what the credit unions demanded. They will drop the credit card cross-collateralization; beyond that, they won’t budge.

 

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30

Mar 2013

Can they put a lien on a house I bought after the bankruptcy?

Posted by / in Virginia Bankruptcy / 9 comments

Did you put off filing bankruptcy until after somebody got a judgment against you?

Pre-bankruptcy judgments are liens on property you own before the bankruptcy.  (Sometimes they can be removed;  sometimes they can’t.)   But they cannot put a lien on a house you buy after the bankruptcy.

At least, not legally.

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26

Oct 2011

Do I need to file business bankruptcy?

Posted by / in Virginia Bankruptcy / 2 comments

Do I need to file business bankruptcy?

A lot of people who think they need to file business bankruptcy really don’t.   They often need to do a personal bankruptcy, instead.  And they need to just dissolve their LLC or S corporation.  Does this apply to you?

You probably don’t like to hear from me that you need to file a personal bankruptcy.  After all, Donald Trump has been through three or four business bankruptcies and NEVER filed a personal bankruptcy.  Why?

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04

Oct 2011

Bankruptcy and bank statements

Posted by / in General Information About Bankruptcy Law / 43 comments

Bankruptcy and bank statements

Planning to file bankruptcy?  You will need to round up bank statements.  You’ll need them at the beginning of the bankruptcy process; and you’ll need them again for your bankruptcy hearing.

(Here are specific instructions on what bank statements you need for your bankruptcy hearing in Alexandria, Virginia.)

Since you need to tell the bankruptcy court about all your accounts when you file your bankruptcy papers, you want to talk them over with your lawyer early–in time to identify and fix any problems.

Virginia Bankruptcy Lawyer Robert Weed

Bring bank statements on every account in your name, when you first meet with your bankruptcy lawyer.You will need to tell the court about every account your name is on.  So you and your lawyer needs to know what those accounts are.

Does that include the account with only five dollars that you never use any more?  Yes.

Does that include your mother’s account that she “just put your name on in case of emergency”?  Yes.

Does that include the account where only your wife’s paycheck goes, but is in both names?  Yes.

Does this includes credit unions, too?  Yes.

Does it includes accounts you have with your minor children?  Yes.  And also college savings plans you have for them.

Does it includes money markets?  And investment, brokerage accounts?  Yes and yes.

More than just banks, it includes every place you have money.

When you first talk to your lawyer, you need to talk about all those accounts.  So bring bank statements–and other accounts–with you.

Is your mother’s $200,000 life savings–in the account you are on “for emergencies”–going to be a problem?  You want to talk that over when you first meet with your lawyer.  Do not wait and bring it up when you are signing the final draft of your bankruptcy papers.

The same thing with your wife’s account that’s “in both names.”

When you bring in the bank statements, then you are not guessing.  You and your lawyer can see whether, and how, your name is listed on each account.  And how much money goes through it every month.

Both of those can be important to getting your bankruptcy approved–without having the bankruptcy trustee take some of your money.  (Or worse, take some money that’s not yours–that belongs to someone else in the family.)

Getting through bankruptcy, without losing any money, may take some planning.  Your lawyer may have your wife change her direct deposit to a different account–one only in her name.  Your lawyer may want mom to take all the money out and put it in a different account.  Maybe the lawyer will just want proof of where mom got all that money.

Besides the bankruptcy trustee maybe grabbing those accounts, some of your creditors might try to get to them.   Your lawyer will want to compare your accounts with your creditors–and may suggest you change banks for that reason.

All that takes time and planning–so make sure you bring in all those bank and other account statements at the beginning.

Toward the end of the bankruptcy process, you are required to show those statements to your bankruptcy trustee.  What statements?  Every one that your name is on.

You need to give your bankruptcy trustee copies of your bank statements. That can be a big headache.

Those will mostly be the same accounts that you went over with your lawyer at the beginning, but maybe with some changes.  If you have accounts that you don’t use, your lawyer may have told you to close them.  If your accounts were in a bank where they weren’t safe, you may have new accounts now.

The bankruptcy trustee is looking at your account statements for two reasons.  First, because the law (Bankruptcy Rule 4002) requires it.  Second, to see if you had too much money on the day you filed your bankruptcy case.  (“Too much money” meaning enough that the bankruptcy trustee can grab some of it.)

Sometimes getting those bank statements is a problem, if you wait until after your case is filed.  Some banks, and especially some credit unions, stop sending statements when they get notice of the bankruptcy.  And they may cut off your internet access, too.

(Stopping the statements and cutting off internet access is most likely a problem if you owe money to that bank.  They don’t want to be violating the bankruptcy law by trying to collect your old debts, so they just stop sending you ANYTHING.)

I recommend a two step process.  First, when you come in for your court preparation appointment, bring your most recent bank statements.  Those may be a few days, or even a few weeks old.

Then, the day after your bankruptcy case is filed and your papers go down to the court, get an internet print out from the end date of the last statement on through to the day after your bankruptcy is filed.  Take care of that right away–in case the banks and credit unions cut off your internet access when they get notice of the bankruptcy.

Taking care of bank statements–and all account statements–both early and late in the bankruptcy process, is a key to have your bankruptcy case go smoothly.

 

Bankruptcy and bank statements: Update–there’s now a charge

Filed a bankruptcy case for some folks last week who had SIXTEEN bank accounts. Half of them they hadn’t used in years, but kept open because it was too much trouble to close them. Now they are trying to get account statements showing the date the bankruptcy was filed, and the bank is not cooperating.

Duh–if you’ve left a three dollar balance on a bank account for four years, the bank is NOT going to consider you a good customer. And if you thought it was too much trouble to close those accounts before you file bankruptcy, see how much trouble it is to get that bank statement balance now that you have filed bankruptcy.

You need to do yourself–and the bank–and the bankruptcy court a favor and close accounts you are not actively using.

So, I’m starting to charge. I’mn charging for the extra paperwork we have when people have multiple, unnecessary bank accounts.

For a single person, your first FIVE bank accounts are free. If you have more than FIVE! accounts on the day you file bankruptcy, there’s a $50.00 charge.

For a married couple the first eight are FREE. After eight, there’s a fifty dollar charge.

(You also get one more for free for each child you have.)

Each bank account you have means a lot of work–for you, for me, for the bankruptcy trustee. And the more you have, the harder it is–for you, me. and the bankruptcy trustee–to make sure they are all covered. So, close ’em.

If it’s too much trouble to close them, I’m charging for the extra paperwork on my end. You will still have to do extra work to get each statement balance. And if you get sent home from your hearing because the trustee thinks you missed one statement, you were warned.

So, close those accounts you’re not using.

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24

Sep 2011

Bankruptcy means test: how big families can pass

Posted by / in General Information About Bankruptcy Law / 12 comments

The 2005 bankruptcy law is unfair to families.   If you have children, you need to fill out your bankruptcy means test budget very carefully.  Here’s why.

The means test in the 2005 bankruptcy law is easy on singles, and hard on big families.    Here’s an example:  a household of one is allowed $300 for food.  A family of four is allowed $757.   That’s ten dollars a day to feed the first person in the family–$5.07 a day each for the next three.  (When you go above four, it drops to $4.80.)

Congress set this up so that just trying to take care of your kids is called bankruptcy “abuse.”

There’s not much we can do about the unfairness of what the bankruptcy law allows for food and clothing.   But, other things you spend money on for your children, you are allowed to claim your real cost.

Those are the areas where you need to focus when you fill in your bankruptcy means test budget.

Child care.  Most families pay for child care by the week.  And then multiply by four to calculate the monthly.  But you should multiply by 4.333.  Because there  are more than twenty eight days in a month–usually thirty or thirty one.   So don’t short yourself.  Budgeting those extra three days could be the difference between having your bankruptcy approved and having it turned down.

Besides pre-school or after school care, budget for baby-sitting.  Most families, maybe once a month, both mom and dad have to go somewhere, together, and you need a sitter.   That twenty bucks or so goes in your bankruptcy means test budget, too.

Do you send the kids to summer camp?  That’s child care–and goes into your child care budget.

Are the kids lagging in school?  Let’s make sure we take advantage of that.  (In bankruptcy everything is upside down–bad is good; good is bad.)  So having trouble in school is an advantage in bankruptcy.

school boy

Kids struggling in school? Money for tutoring is allowed in your bankruptcy means test budget.

You are allowed to budget $125 per month to pay for schooling.  Now if the kids are in full time private school, at $125 a month doesn’t begin to cover it.  But if the children need tutoring to get through a tough class–or need to pay for summer school to catch up–that could be that $125 per month you are allowed in your bankruptcy budget.

(This schooling budget only covers kids up through age 17.  Congress says they are on their own for college.)

Are the kids having big trouble in school?  If the children are “challenged,” then the $125 per month cap doesn’t apply.  Your bankruptcy budget for education for employment of physically or mentally challenged children is unlimited.   (And goes past age 18, too.)

I see some parents who put their kids in private school because they couldn’t handle the public schools.  In that case, you can claim that whole expense.

Health and medical.   The bankruptcy means test allows you $60 per person for health and medical expenses.  Most people think they spend a lot less–but actually spend a lot more.

A lot of what you think of as grocery money can actually be counted at health care.  And for healthcare, unlike groceries, you can claim above the allowance.

Let’s start at Walgreens or CVS.    Vitamins–that’s health care.  Tylenol, allergy medication–health care.   Shampoo and toothpaste goes in the grocery budget–but anything stronger is health care.   Does your dentist recommend Listerine–that’s healthcare.

Lots of families are spending $20 or more per person on over-the-counter stuff that you can claim in your health care budget.

Prescriptions.  Should be obvious, but don’t leave it out.

Glasses or contacts.  According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75% of adults use some sort of vision correction.   I’m spending over four hundred dollars a year–thirty five dollars a month–on glasses.  Your children may be spending more–because they lose or break them.

The dentist.  Just routine dental check ups can cost a couple hundred dollars a year.  Maybe half the people I talk to about bankruptcy tell me they are avoiding the dentist because they can’t afford what it will cost.  Budget that in.

You are allowed to claim the dental work you’ve been putting off  as health care.

Braces.  Approximately 4 million people are in braces in the US at any one time.    Orthodontics can cost a couple hundred dollars a month.  If the children need braces, put it in your budget.

Runny noses and broken arms.  In addition to preventive care, children (and adults) catch cold and flu, break their arms, and end up at the doctor’s one way or another.  Allow something for the unexpected in your bankruptcy health care budget.

Mental health.   A Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index survey conducted in 2009 revealed that about 40 million American adults had recently been diagnosed with depression.

When life knocks you down, there can be changes in the chemistry of your brain.  People need help–counselling or medications or both–to get back to their right mind.  Things that caused your financial problems–unemployment, break-ups, other health problems–can also bring on depression.

If depression is impacting your family, be sure to add that to your health care budget.  (And be sure to take care of it, too.)

Don’t forget these categories

Charitable giving.  Most people have a good handle on what they give to their church, their favorite cause, or other regular commitment.

But if you have children (or even if you don’t), you get hit for donations for Girl Scout cookies, the high school band, and that kind of thing.  I’m guessing most families spend at ten dollars a month on these neighbor-to-neighbor charities.

Elderlies.  Along with the family in your home, many of us are helping out parents or grandparents.  One of the very few good changes in the 2005 bankruptcy law, help for elderly (or disabled) family members is now expressly ok.  (This includes family overseas.)  

To get your bankruptcy approved, we need to show the court where you need to spend your money.  People who come to talk to me about bankruptcy have been living from paycheck to paycheck–usually for a long time.  But they are often so stressed, they really don’t know where the money has been going.

I hope this article helps you think clearly about your budget–so we can get your bankruptcy approved.

 

 

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15

Sep 2011

Bankruptcy means test: Watch out for January 2012!

Posted by / in The 2005 Bankruptcy Law / 8 comments

Your bankruptcy means test may be too high if you file your bankruptcy case in January 2012.

People with bi-weekly paychecks get 26 paychecks a year.  Usually you will have 13 paychecks in the six months look-back period of the bankruptcy means test.    But some people will have 14 paychecks instead of 13 for the six months of July – December 2011.  If your first September paycheck was dated September 9, you will be one of those people.  (It’s no problem if you got paid on September 2.)

Bankruptcy lawyer Robert Weed: If you got paid September 9, 2011, filing bankruptcy January 2012 could be a mistake.

Most people on bi-weekly pay look forward to those months with three checks.  They usually come every six months.  But this year, if you got paid September 9, both July and December will be three check months.  (Your next three check month will be June 2012.)  But in bankruptcy, good is bad.  That 14th paycheck could force you into a five year Chapter 13 bankruptcy repayment plan, because your income could be just a little too high.)

Here’s one example:

Take a single parent supporting one child in Virginia making exactly $30.00 a hour, no overtime, renting, one paid for car, no medical issues, no child care.    That family is means test eligible for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, if the parent files in October 2011 or November 2011, or December 2011, or February 2012, or March 2012.  But in January 2012:  not eligible. Mandatory five year Chapter 13 payment plan.

This problem can be fixed with proper planning.  I had to change the bankruptcy filing date for a client I met yesterday, to avoid that problem.  Otherwise, it would cost him $300 per month for 60 months–an $18,000 mistake.

The 2005 Bankruptcy Reform has a lot of tricks and traps.  This is one of them.

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07

Aug 2011

Bankruptcy and security clearance, and defense cutbacks.

Posted by / in General Information About Bankruptcy Law / 19 comments

Defense cutbacks are now certain.  (At least as certain as anything is in this world.)

Lots of people whose jobs seem safe now will soon be out of work.

Will you lose your job and get behind on your debts?  Please don’t jeopardize your security clearance–and your future.  Please don’t put off filing bankruptcy.

That’s the lesson of the thousand people with security clearances I’ve helped. And the lesson of the half dozen who lost their security clearances because they filed bankruptcy too late.

Bankruptcy and security clearance

Virginia bankruptcy lawyer Robert Weed on Security Clearances

Some people think the worst thing you can do for your clearance is file bankruptcy. That’s completely false. The worst thing you can do is to ignore the problem. If you get into financial trouble, you need to talk to your FSO and then clean it up.

Some people think bankruptcy destroys your security clearance.  That is false.  The worst thing for your security clearance is “irresponsibility.”

It is irresponsible to get into debt you can’t pay.

But if you have debt you can’t pay, the responsible thing to do is clean it up.  The irresponsible thing is to ignore it.   The irresponsible thing is to drag out the problem.

This is not just me talking.  The legal office of the Air Force Academy says the same thing.  (Thanks to the Air Force Academy for putting this valuable information in writing.  So much in the security clearance world is not for publication.)

“Not filing for bankruptcy may make you more of a security risk due to the size of your outstanding debts. By the same token, using a government-approved means of dealing with your debts may actually be viewed as an indication of financial responsibility. Eliminating your debts through bankruptcy may make you less of a security risk.”

Here’s a post on security clearances, from the US Army Ft Meade.  They say it’s a “myth” that filing bankruptcy means you lose your clearance.  They say, and I agree, you need to be ready to explain how and why you got into trouble.

Let me make it clear.  Bankruptcy is not a good thing.  Paying everything on time is a good thing.  But bankruptcy is better than not paying. It is better than ignoring the problem.

I’ve helped a thousand people with clearances; and I know a handful who have lost their clearances.  Nearly all lost clearances for an obvious reason–they did not come to see me in time.  They did nothing until they were told they were in clearance trouble for financial irresponsibility.  Then they checked around.   Then they found out they should have filed bankruptcy when they first got into trouble.

Too late.  They needed to show responsibility by facing the problem when they first got into the financial problem.   Waiting until you get into a clearance problem is waiting too long.

Don’t wait too long.

Bankruptcy and Security Clearance articles by two other lawyers

(Russ DeMott, a bankruptcy lawyer in Charleston, SC, has an excellent article on bankruptcy and security clearances.   His experience is pretty much the same as mine.  Except that he’s mostly talking about active duty military people.  And my experience is mainly with civilians:  DoD, CIA and Homeland Security employees, and employees of contractors in the defense, intelligence and security fields.)

(Here’s a more recent article by Brett Weiss, a bankruptcy lawyer in Maryland, who says pretty much what I am saying here about bankruptcy and security clearances.    He also emphasizes the importance of self reporting to your clearance officer when you get into financial trouble, and before you file the bankruptcy.)

Bankruptcy and Security Clearance Update–December 2014

Yesterday, a Federal agent came to talk to me.  A young lawyer who had worked for me for a couple years had taken a Federal job.  she needed a clearance.

So the Federal agent was doing an investigation.

No surprise there.

Here’s the headline.  The Federal agent, the guy doing the clearance investigation, had filed bankruptcy with me back in 2001.  He didn’t just have a clearance himself–he was doing clearance investigation.  (And back in 2001 he was working for the same agency he was working for now.)

Proof of what I tell people. If you get into financial trouble, you need to clean it up.  And if you can’t clean it up any other way, then file bankruptcy.  The people who lose their clearances are the people who just let the problem get worse.  Be responsible, take control, fix the problem.  File bankruptcy.   (And don’t forget to self-report.)

Bankruptcy and Security Clearance Update–December 2015

Just filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy for Don and Donna.  Both disabled veterans, both battling multiple medical issues, and starting a new family.

They first came to see me in February 2014.  they were in trouble because they downed a house in an area with defense cutbacks that they couldn’t sell.   Told them they needed to file bankruptcy to fix that problem.

Don lost his nerve and they didn’t come back until October 2015.  Don’s clearance had been suspended, along with his job, for financial irresponsibility–and failure to self report.  That’s exactly what I told him would happen, if he did NOT file bankruptcy.  If he was a contract, he’d just be out of luck–and out of a career.  Because he’s a Federal employee, he has more protections.  I’m HOPING that his clearance will be saved on appeal, now that he has, finally, taken care of the problem.

 

Bankruptcy and Security Clearance Update–December 2017

December 28, 2017

Got an email today from “Candace.” She said she had lost her security clearance because of “financial concerns.” I make this point over and over. People do NOT lose their clearance for filing bankruptcy. You DO lose your clearance for not dealing with the problem. Usually dealing with the problem involves three steps. Talk with a lawyer and figure out what you have to do. Self report that you have financial problems and are taking steps to deal with them. If necessary have the action you are taking approved by a court.

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